Home » The Presidents I Have Known from 1860-1918 by Simon Wolf
The Presidents I Have Known from 1860-1918 Simon Wolf

The Presidents I Have Known from 1860-1918

Simon Wolf

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230328454
Paperback
124 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ... And at the meeting ofMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ... And at the meeting of the Jewish Chautauqua Society, after the death of John Hay, I pronounced the following eulogy, which being brought to the attention of the President, he expressed great satisfaction, and again showed his usual good feeling for my effort: tribute to john hay. Goethe said he was noble, he was pure, he was philanthropic, which represents and personifies John Hay. In letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson, lately published in the Atlantic Monthly, among other things, he describes a visit to Washington, during the early part of the Civil War, how one evening he attended a reception at the home of the Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon P. Chase, and among many notable striking personages, the young Secretary to the President was particularly noticeable. (In a footnote by the editor of the Atlantic, it states that Mr. Emerson did not know the name of the young Secretary, but that undoubtedly it must have been John Hay), and what appealed to the Concord philosopher has appealed to all men at home and abroad who came in touch with John Hay. He was, in my opinion, the highest developed type of ideal Americanism, pure in thought and yet not a Puritan- Christian in faith and in no wise sectarian- American in diplomacy and patriotism, and yet cosmopolitan. He typified and personified all that was lovable in man and all that was sympathetic, human and just in the affairs of the world. Persecution, bigotry, and intolerance were to him the outcome of a benighted age, and every fibre of his being revolted against governments and individuals that practised them. He was the ideal American, sans peur, sans reproche. His state papers will rank with the best of any age, and his diplomacy will be used as a part of the curriculum in the schools...